Wednesday, April 11, 2012

The Garden in April

Spring fever has got the best of me, has it you?  I can't focus on anything!  I just want to be outside puttering around, playing in the dirt and admiring the plants.  Blogging has definitely taken a back seat, but then, if a garden blogger never gardens, what does a garden blogger have to write about on her garden blog?

I thought I would show you a few pictures of my garden, but with a few words, so I'll have to forgo Wordless Wednesday today; I'll likely keep it short, just the same.


This is my front yard a week or two ago when the Coral Bells azaleas were blooming.  Most of the azaleas have finished now; a few Delaware Valley White and George Tabor (lavender/pink) still have flowers.  The grass always looks so good as spring gets going.  Unfortunately it won't stay that way for very long.


Do you like this pink camellia?  The color is a little off here; in the garden it was more coral, and it looked gorgeous with the pink and yellow daffodils.  What's interesting is this:  My mother had given my husband and me two Professor Charles Sargent camellias for Christmas a year ago.  It has blooms like this --


Deep red, full, started blooming in December, I believe.  But one day while I was out enjoying the daffodils (which came early this year), I saw a coral pink camellia on the same plant the red flowers had bloomed on!  At first I just thought it was just a faded red one, but on closer inspection, it was different in lots of ways, and anyway there was nothing faded about it, it was fresh and new!


I think that cuttings from two different plants were put in the same pot and grown on together (there doesn't appear to be a graft) so now I have a shrub that blooms two different colors, one later than the other.  I love both of them!  I hope they continue to do well together.  You don't think I should cut one of them out, do you, or try to separate them?

In the back, there's a cottage garden mix of perennials and herbs. I've added quite a few things and moved a few of them around since last summer.  The daffodils will die back and I'll be adding some annuals like nasturtium and lemon and tangerine gem marigolds soon.  The seeds are sprouting in my dining room window right now.


Our bluebird box is at the edge of this garden, to the left of the photo. We're so excited to have residents.  They are busy little creatures, in and out of the box all day long.

See if you can find the surprise in this picture --


Right in the middle of our Shasta viburnum is a cardinal nest! It's over my head a couple of feet, so I couldn't see inside.  It has been so much fun watching the industrious female flying in and out of the viburnum and the protective male perched on a maple branch nearby, guarding the nest.

I found out that cardinals have regional differences in the songs they sing.  You mean my cardinals have a southern accent?  I listened to several YouTube videos before I found one that sounded like ours (from PA, so maybe not!) I think you'll like this; it's informative and shortI hope you're getting out into your garden and enjoying Spring, too.  Earth Day is coming up -- any plans?

~*~

16 comments:

  1. Thank you for the little tour. It was very information. Love the info about the Northern Cardinal. Have fun gardening today!

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    1. thank you, lucy. i had no idea our cardinal was called a northern cardinal, did you? or do you have cardinals in texas?

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  2. Love this post. The cardinals sound just like the ones on this side of town.

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    1. lol, mom. i guess a couple of miles doesn't make too much difference, but if you listen to some other cardinal videos, it's amazing how unfamiliar some of them are.

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  3. I had no idea about the different cardinal songs! I do love seeing all of the different birds in my yard and garden.

    Your garden is beautiful - you should be very proud!

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    1. thank you very much, jessica. we are fortunate to have so many birds in and around charlotte, aren't we? the garden is so chirpy it's downright noisy sometimes!

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  4. Southern accent! Ha! I never knew they had a drawl in the south! Funny! :) I love the picture of your garden with the azaleas in bloom. Just gorgeous. And what a great camellia! If you have two trunks, you might want to separate them if they are small. But I would be scared of killing one! Good luck deciding what to do.

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    1. i love your laugh, holley! i thought the same thing. :D i agree about the camellia...would be nice to separate them, but i'm afraid of killing one (or both!)

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  5. I'm a sucker for camelias, though I don't have any myself. (Yet...)

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    1. soren, i'm not sure what sort of winter temperatures you have in denmark, but you can grow camellias successfully in pots and bring them inside in the winter if necessary. also, some are much more hardy than others. the best climate seems to be USDA zones 8 - 10 or so (nothing below 10 degrees F, or about -12 C).

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  6. Guess my cardinals are from PA too. I didn't know they had such a difference in regions.
    I am not sure how large your Camellias are, but if small enough you could dig up the double and gently try to separate the roots then replant. Just make sure they have two different stems/trunks. I did that with a Jane Magnolia, turned out there were two in the pot. I used the wheelbarrow filled with water to keep the roots moist and wash away soil that was holding them together. The smaller one struggled a bit, but I think it was because of the spot I put her. Once I moved her (again poor baby) to a new location she is doing a lot better. Just imagine once they grow to maturity how crowded they would be.

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    1. good news about your jane magnolias! my oldest loves those and it happens to be her middle name, too, which i thought was appropriate. i'm afraid to separate my camellias, but i might just go for it anyway. thanks for the tips...you've given me some confidence.

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  7. NC is breathtaking in the spring, but them I'm a little biased. We had a touch of frost this morning....how about you?

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    1. didn't have any frost, GUTI, but was worried. we covered the fully leafed out japanese maple to try to prevent any burned tips and it seems to have worked, or maybe just wasn't necessary in the first place.

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