Thursday, June 10, 2010

Indian Blanket, Gaillardia pulchella


Indian Blankets will bloom at the coast of North Carolina all summer.    They are abundant, reseeding in all the breezy, salty fields just behind the seaside dunes.  You might assume they are native.  They were introduced here, though, from the central United States; Oklahoma designated this Gaillardia its state flower.  The bright red-orange and yellow of the petals are a welcome sight against the expanses of browns and greens along our coast.  I'm glad they spread this way.

7 comments:

  1. I don't see these much on South Carolina's coast, but also do not go into people's gardens( or closer to them ) on the coast...as I am busy staring at the ocean ! Looks like those were close to the dunes. thanks much, Gina

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  2. I lived on Folly Beach in SC for a time and these were grew everywhere, even in the cracked concrete. It is one tough perennial.

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  3. wow they do look amazing indeed especially with that backdrop!

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  4. Gina, It took me a few years to look at anything but the ocean at the coast, too! It's hard to resist when you're nearby.

    Les, I guess some people might consider it invasive. I haven't looked into it. I just think it's pretty.

    Sunny, thanks for stopping by. I'm looking forward to taking more time with your blogs. Love the creativity there.

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  5. Gaillardia pretty rare or nonexistent in the wild up here, but it's good enough at self-seeding to be a fixture in the garden for years. It was planted deliberately once, and has shown up in various spots ever since then.

    Thank you for checking out my blog - the posts aren't always about gardening or plants, but a lot of them are during the growing season.

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  6. Hi, Daricia, Gaillardias grew everywhere in CA, but I never really though of them as an NC plant! Thanks for your pictures and the info! :)

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  7. RPS77, I learned several plant history tidbits from your blog. I like your non-plant posts, too.

    Ruth, It really does look more like a garden escapee than an NC plant.

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